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Library Resources for Centers & Online Students

Library Catalog

Use the library catalog to search for books and other materials in the library catalog.

You may click the Catalog link on the website, or use the quick search box:

Library Catalog on homepage

Library Catalog Video Tutorial

Library Catalog from Lawrence W. Tyree Library on Vimeo.

This video tutorial will introduce you to using the library catalog to locate items held by the Lawrence W. Tyree Library at Santa Fe College.

To access the Library Catalog, click the Catalog link under the photo of the Library. This will take you to the library catalog's basic search screen.

The catalog has many different ways to search. For information on a topic, choose Keyword. If you know the title or author of an item, choose Title or Author. If you know the Library of Congress subject heading for your topic, choose Subject Heading. Using subject headings will give you more precise search results than using keywords. Most searches will use one of these four search methods.

Let's search for a topic. Since we don't know the Library of Congress subject heading, we are going to do a keyword search. Our topic is wind energy, so type these keywords into the search box and click Search.

The number of matching results is displayed under the search bar.

Icons in each record will show if it is a book, an eBook, or another format such as a streaming video.

Let’s take a look at the result Wind Energy for the Rest of Us: A Comprehensive Guide to Wind Power and How to Use It. We can learn a lot about this item from the results screen by looking at the bottom of its record.

Santa Fe/Northwest Campus Circulating indicates that this book is in our library on the Northwest Campus and is part of the Circulating Collection, meaning that it can be checked out of the library.

Available indicates that this book is available for check out and should be on the shelves. If the book was already checked out, a due date would show here.

To find this book on the shelf, you need its call number. The call number for this book is TJ820 .G562 2016. The call number includes everything from the first letter to the date. To see where this call number is located in the library, click the Map It button.

The map will pop up in new window and shows that this book is located on the 3rd floor. The highlighted area indicates where to find this book on the 3rd floor. All of the books on the 3rd floor may be checked out.

To learn even more about this book, click the title to view the complete record.

The full record contains information about the author, title, and publication information. Some records contain a table of contents and a summary of the item.

Scroll down to the bottom of the record to view the Library of Congress subject headings. These are the more precise terms to search. In this case, the main subject headings are wind power and wind turbines. To get better search results, search one of these terms as a Subject Heading.

The library catalog offers many ways to refine your search. On the left side of the results page, use the options under Format to limit your search to a specific format such as online resources, media, or streaming video. If you choose "streaming video," for example, you will fine many online videos on the topic of wind energy. These and other online resources do require that you login with your Santa Fe account

This concludes the video tutorial on using the library catalog. If you have any questions, please contact a librarian:

352-395-5409
reference@sfcollege.edu
Building Y, NW Campus
sfcollege.edu/library

Catalog Help

Step 1: Understanding Results

The following image shows the first result in the library catalog for business success.

Book result in the library catalog

The following areas are highlighted in the image:

  1. Title of the book (Build your dream network : forging powerful relationships in a hyper-connected world)
  2. Author of the book (J. Kelly Hoey)
  3. Material Icon (book) - shows which type of material this item is
  4. Library location - this book is located on the Northwest Campus, in the Circulating collection
  5. Call Number (HD69.S8 H64 2017) - address for the book, which allows you to physically locate the book along with others of the same subject
  6. Availability - this book is currently available on the shelf and is not yet checked out

Step 2: Checking Availability

Once you have located an item in the library catalog, look on the far right to see its availability. If a book is Available, it can be checked out and is currently on the shelf.

Available

If an item is listed as NonCirculating or In-House Use, these items do not leave the Library. Please contact a librarian for assistance.

Step 3: Having a Book Delivered to Your Center

To have a book sent to your Center, follow these steps:

Click the Place a Hold link.

Place a Hold

Log in to your library account. Your Borrower ID is your 8 digit SF ID number; your PIN/Password is the last four digits of the same number. If you need help logging in, please call the Reference Desk at 352-395-5409.

Borrower ID and PIN
Choose your Center in the Pickup Location drop down box.
Choose your Center location
Books will be delivered to your Center's reception desk within 2 business days. You may also return the book to the reception desk.

Step 4: Citing a Book

If you incorporate content from a book into your paper, you will need to cite your source. The following video tutorials demonstrate how to create a References (APA) or Works Cited (MLA) entry for a book. If you need additional assistance with citations, please see Research 101: Citing Your Sources.

APA: Citing Books from Lawrence W. Tyree Library on Vimeo.

This video tutorial demonstrates how to cite books using APA format.

This tutorial will show the basics for citing a book, how to cite if there is more than one author or if a book is not a first edition, and how to cite a chapter from an edited book.

Every APA citation in a references list needs four parts: who, when, what, and where. As you go through these examples, you will learn how to identify these four parts and how to place and format them into a proper APA citation.

Example 1: A Book With One Author

For the first example, you will learn how to cite this book: Prisoners of War: A Reference Handbook.

The first step is to identify who wrote this. The author of this book is Arnold Krammer.

To list an author, write the last name, a comma, and the first letter of the first name, followed by a period. If the author has a middle name or middle initial, include the middle initial as well.

Example:
Krammer, A.

Next, identify when this book was written. In this case, you will need to open the book and look inside (usually on the back of the title page) to find the date, 2008.

List the date after the author, in parentheses, followed by a period.

Example:
Krammer, A. (2008).

Next, identify what this title is. The cover shows the title is Prisoners of War: A Reference Handbook. Even though there is no colon on the front page, A Reference Handbook is in a smaller font. This shows that it is the subtitle, and should be separated from the title with a colon.

List the title of the book after the date, in italics. Make sure you only capitalize the first word of the title, the first word of the subtitle (which comes after the colon), and any proper nouns.

Example:
Krammer, A. (2008). Prisoners of war: A reference handbook.

The last information you need is the where. In this case, you need the publisher and the publication city and state. Opening this book to its title page shows that the publisher is Praeger Security International, and the publication location is Westport, CT. You only need to provide the first city.

Type the city, a comma, and then the state using the two-letter postal abbreviation. Then type a colon, followed by the name of the publisher, and end your citation with a period. This concludes the book's citation.

Example:
Krammer, A. (2008). Prisoners of war: A reference handbook. Westport, CT: Praeger Security International.

If you refer to a work in your paper, either by directly quoting, paraphrasing, or by referring to main ideas, you will need to include an in-text parenthetical citation. There are a number of ways to do this. In this example, a signal phrase is used to introduce a direct quote. Note that the author’s name is given in the text, and the publication date and page number(s) are enclosed in parentheses at the beginning and end of the sentence.

Example:
As Krammer (2008) writes, “The history of the prisoner of war is as old as the history of warfare and certainly as brutal” (p. 1).

Example 2: Multiple Authors; Editions

For this next book, there are two authors: Kenneth D. Wald and Allison Calhoun-Brown. You can also obtain the date, the title, and the publication information from the book, using the steps illustrated in the first example. Note that this book is a fifth edition; you will need to include that information in your citation as well.

When citing multiple authors, list the first author as normal, followed by a comma, an &, and then the second author. Note that the first author has a middle initial, so this is included. The edition is placed right after the title but before the period. Type 5th ed. within parentheses, and place a period at the end.

Example:
Wald, K. D., & Calhoun-Brown, A. (2007). Religion and politics in the United States (5th ed.). Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

Example 3: A Chapter in an Edited Book

In this example, the entire book is overseen by editors, but each chapter has a different author. If you are only using information from a single chapter, you will need to cite it a certain way.

First, find the general information for this book, as demonstrated in the previous examples. Then you need to find the author, title, and page numbers of the chapter you are citing.

To cite, list the author of the chapter first, followed by the date and the title of the chapter. Note that the title of the chapter is not in italics. Then type the word In, and list the editors of the book, with the initials first. At the end of their names, list Ed. or Eds. in parentheses. Then, type a comma, the title of the book, and include the page numbers in parentheses. End with the publication information.

Example:
Landes, D. (2000). Culture makes almost all the difference. In L. E. Harrison & S. P. Huntington (Eds.), Culture matters: How values shape human progress (pp. 2-13). New York, NY: Basic Books.

For more examples and additional situations you may encounter when citing books, visit the Santa Fe Library’s APA Citations research guide. This can be found by visiting the library’s website, clicking Guides > Citation Guides and then APA Citation Guide.

This concludes the video tutorial on citing books using APA. If you still have questions, please contact a librarian:

352-395-5409
reference@sfcollege.edu
sfcollege.edu/library

MLA: Citing Books from Lawrence W. Tyree Library on Vimeo.

This video tutorial will demonstrate how to cite books using the MLA citation style guide.

This tutorial will show the basics for citing a book, how to cite if there is more than one author or if a book is not a first edition, and how to cite a chapter from an edited book.

MLA citations may include a variety of components. Sources may be part of a larger source, called a container. Examples of containers may be a database, website, or a book. The following examples will show you how to identify these components and how to place and format them into a proper MLA citation.

Example 1: A Book With One Author

For the first example, you will learn how to cite this book: Visual Shock: A History of Art Controversies in American Culture.

To locate the information you need to cite the book, turn to the title page. The first piece of information you need is the author of the book. The author of this book is Michael Kammen.

To list an author, type the name in reverse order. Type the last name, a comma, and the first name, followed by a period. If the author’s middle name or initial is given, include it after the first name.

Example:
Kammen, Michael.

Next, identify the title of the book. The title page shows the title is Visual Shock: A History of Art Controversies in American Culture. Even though there is no colon on the title page, A History of Art Controversies in American Culture is in a smaller font; this shows that it is the subtitle and should be separated from the title with a colon.

The title of the book, in italics, is listed after the author. Capitalize the first word of the title, the first word of the subtitle (which comes after the colon), and all important words. Place a period after the title.

Example:
Kammen, Michael. Visual Shock: A History of Art Controversies in American Culture.

Next, identify the publication information. This is the name of the publisher and the year it was published. If this information is not available on the title page, look for it on the verso, which is the back of the title page. This book was published by Alfred A. Knopf in 2006.

The publisher’s name, in this case Alfred A. Knopf, is listed after the title. If the word Press is part of the publisher’s name, abbreviate it to P. The publisher’s name is followed by a comma and the year the book was published. Place a period after the year. This completes the citation.

Example:
Kammen, Michael. Visual Shock: A History of Art Controversies in American Culture. Alfred A. Knopf, 2006.

If you refer to a work in your paper, by directly quoting, paraphrasing, or by referring to main ideas, you will need to include an in-text parenthetical citation. There are a number of ways to do this. In this example, a signal phrase is used to introduce a direct quote. Note that the author’s name is given in the text, and the page number is enclosed in parentheses at the end of the sentence.

Example:
Americans have increasingly shown their support of art through museum visits. As reported by Kammen, "Attendance at art museums rose from 22 million per year in 1962 to well over 100 million in 2000" (304).

Example 2: Multiple Authors; Editions

In this example, there are two authors (Anthony J. Fonseca and June Michele Pulliam). You can obtain the title and the publication information from the book, using the steps illustrated in the first example. Note that this book is a second edition; you will need to include that information in your citation.

When citing two authors, list the first author’s name in reverse order, followed by a comma and the word and. Then list the next author. The second author’s name is not reversed; list it in normal order. If an item has three or more authors, list only the first author’s name, followed by et al. The edition follows the period after the title. Type the edition number followed by ed., then a comma and continue on to the publication information.

Example:
Fonseca, Anthony J., and June Michele Pulliam. Hooked on Horror: A Guide to Reading Interests in Horror Fiction. 2nd ed., Libraries Unlimited, 2002.

Example 3: A Chapter in an Edited Book

In this example, the entire book is overseen by editors, but each chapter has a different author. If you are only using information from a single chapter, you will need to cite it a certain way.

First, find the general information for this book, as demonstrated in the previous examples. This is the container. Note that the editors’ names will be in place of the authors’ names for the book as a whole. Then find the author, title and page numbers of the chapter you are citing.

To cite, list the author of the chapter first, followed by the title of the chapter. Note that the title of the chapter is enclosed in quotation marks. For this example, the first word of the title is italicized since it is the title of a book, but the rest of the chapter title is not italicized. The chapter title is followed by the book title, and then the words edited by and the editors’ names. List their names in normal order (not reversed). The page numbers of the chapter are listed after the date.

Example:
Nelson, Claudia. “Jade and the Tomboy Tradition.” The Oxford Handbook of Children’s Literature, edited by Julia L. Mickenberg and Lynne Vallone, Oxford UP, 2002, pp. 497-517.

For more examples and additional situations you may encounter when citing books, visit the Santa Fe Library’s MLA Citations research guide. This can be found by visiting the library’s website, clicking Guides > Citation Guides and then MLA Citation Guide.

This concludes the video tutorial on citing books using MLA. If you still have questions, please contact a librarian:

352-395-5409
reference@sfcollege.edu
sfcollege.edu/library