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Library Resources for Centers & Online Students

Finding Articles

If you need to find journal articles for your research, your first stop should be the library databases. These tools include millions of full-text articles available to you for free while you are enrolled at Santa Fe College. The Library subscribes to many different databases that cover a wide variety of subjects and publications, and they are easy to access and use.

Using Library Databases

Step 1: Accessing Library Databases

From the library website, click the Databases button at the top:

Databases link

Step 2: Choosing a Database

Some databases are very general and cover many different subjects, while others are subject-specific.

If you are not sure where to start, look at the Recommended Databases in the left. These are popular databases that are useful for many students. Academic Search Complete is one of the best databases to begin research in.

Recommended Databases area

You may also wish to find databases that are more relevant to your research needs. In the upper list, click the All Subjects drop-down and choose the subject that best fits your research topic. Some subject categories include Business, Education, Health & Medicine, and Science & Technology.

subject categories

Step 3: Finding Articles

Regardless of the database you choose to use, you will be able to type in terms to find specific articles. Pick out the most important words in your topic and search for those; searching an entire sentence does not work particularly well in the databases.

Academic Search Complete search: junk food AND public schools

Look for Full Text links in the results to open the full article.

Full Text links

Step 4: Peer-Reviewed/Scholarly Sources

If your professor tells you that you can only use peer-reviewed or scholarly articles (also sometimes called academic articles), you can easily limit your results to only scholarly articles.

There are several names for scholarly journal articles, but they all are referring to the same thing: articles written by experts in a subject area, published in a journal that accepts articles only if the editorial board approves of its content. The editorial board members are also experts, usually professors or researchers, who make sure the content of each article is original work that expands knowledge in the field of study.

Most databases have a way to limit results to scholarly journals on the search screen. Look for the terms scholarly, peer-reviewed, or academic.

Scholarly (Peer Reviewed) Journals

Step 5: Citing Articles

If you incorporate content from an article into your paper, you will need to cite your source. Many databases will include built-in citation generators to get you started. You can view how to access these citation generators on the Database Citing guide.

Please keep in mind that generated citations are rarely 100% correct. The following video tutorials demonstrate how to create a References (APA) or Works Cited (MLA) entry for a journal article. If you need additional assistance with citations, please see Research 101: Citations.

APA: Citing Journal Articles from Lawrence W. Tyree Library on Vimeo.

This video tutorial will demonstrate how to cite journal articles using APA format.

Every APA citation in a references list needs four parts: who, when, what, and where. As you go through these examples, you will learn how to identify these four parts and how to place and format them into a proper APA citation.

Example 1: A Print Journal Article

For the first example, you will learn how to cite a journal article that you found in a print journal.

The first step is to identify who wrote this article. There are two authors listed: Alex J. Bowers and Ryan Sprott.

To list an author, write the last name, a comma, and the first letter of the first name, followed by a period. If the author has a middle name or middle initial, include the middle initial as well. A second author will follow after a comma and an ampersand (&), in the same format.

Example:
Bowers, A. J., & Sprott, R.

Next, identify when this article was published. For journal articles, you only need the year. In this case, this article was published in 2012. You can typically find the date at the top of the article, or on the cover of the journal.

List the date after the authors, in parentheses, followed by a period.

Example:
Bowers, A. J., & Sprott, R. (2012).

Next, identify what the title of the article is. The title will usually be at the very top of the article, in a larger size font.

List the title of the article after the date. Make sure you only capitalize the first word of the title, the first word of the subtitle (which comes after the colon), and any proper nouns. In this title, only the words Examining and A are capitalized.

Example:
Bowers, A. J., & Sprott, R. (2012). Examining the multiple trajectories associated with dropping out of high school: A growth mixture model analysis.

The last information you need is where you can find the article. In this case, you need the title of the journal, along with the volume, issue (sometimes called number), and page numbers of the article. Usually this information can be found on the cover of the journal, on the table of contents, or at the top of the article. For the page numbers, you should look at the first and last pages of the article.

Type the journal title, in italics, capitalizing all major words, a comma, the volume, also in italics, the number or issue in parentheses, a comma, and then the page numbers of the article. This concludes the citation.

Example:
Bowers, A. J., & Sprott, R. (2012). Examining the multiple trajectories associated with dropping out of high school: A growth mixture model analysis. The Journal of Educational Research, 105(3), 176-195.

If you refer to a work in your paper, either by directly quoting, paraphrasing, or by referring to main ideas, you will need to include an in-text parenthetical citation. There are a number of ways to do this. In this example, a signal phrase is used to introduce a direct quote. Note that the author’s name is given in the text, and the publication date and page number(s) are enclosed in parentheses at the beginning and end of the sentence.

Example:
Bowers & Sprott (2012) claim that “students’ dropping out of high schools in the United States is a well known and pervasive problem” (p. 176).

Example 2: A Journal Article Found Online with a DOI

Often, you will find journal articles online using the library’s databases or other online resources. This article was found online using the database Academic Search Complete. On the left is the article’s record, and on the right is the article itself.

Most of the information you need to cite an article can be found in the database’s record. Look for the title at the top and the information for the when and the where in the line that says Source.

Because this is article is found online, you need one more element. You need the DOI, which stands for Digital Object Identifier. A DOI can be found in the article’s record, or sometimes on the first page of the article.

All the elements of the journal article will be cited just like the first example. The DOI will be listed at the very end, after https://doi.org. You do not need a period after the DOI.

Example:
Confino, A. (2012). Miracles and snow in Palestine and Israel: Tantura, a history of 1948. Israel Studies, 17(2), 25-61. https://doi.org/10.2979/israelstudies.17.2.25

Example 3: A Journal Article Found Online Without a DOI

Not all journal articles will have a DOI. If you have looked through the article and database record carefully and cannot find one, you will need to give the URL of the journal’s homepage. First, make sure you know in which journal the article is published. This article is published in AANA Journal.

Next, go to a search engine such as Google, and enter the journal’s name. You are looking for the URL, or web address, of the official homepage for the journal. In this case, the URL is displayed in green.

This article has eight listed authors. APA tells you that you only have to list the first six authors, give three ellipsis points (. . .), and then list the last author.

Cite the article as normal, but instead of a DOI, type Retrieved from and give the URL of the journal’s homepage. Do not a put a period after the URL.

Example:
Penprase, B., Mileto, L., Bittinger, A., Hranchook, A., Atchley, J. A., Bergakker, S., . . . Franson, H. (2012). The use of high-fidelity simulation in the admissions process: One nurse anesthesia program's experience. AANA Journal80(1), 43-48. Retrieved from http://www.aana.com/newsandjournal/Pages/aanajournalonline.aspx

For any work with more than five authors, when you use an in-text citation, you only need to give the first author’s last name and then type et al. which means "and all the rest."

Example:
“Stimulation has been successfully used in healthcare for skills attainment and master, promotion of safety in the workplace, teamwork, and collaboration” (Penprase et al., 2012, pp. 43-44).

For more examples and additional situations you may encounter when citing journal articles, visit the Santa Fe Library’s APA Citations research guide. This can be found by visiting the library’s website, clicking Guides > Citation Guides and then APA Citation Guide.

This concludes the video tutorial on citing journal articles using APA. If you still have questions, please contact a librarian:

352-395-5409
reference@sfcollege.edu
sfcollege.edu/library

MLA: Citing Journal Articles from Lawrence W. Tyree Library on Vimeo.

This video tutorial will demonstrate how to cite journal articles using the MLA citation style guide.

This tutorial will show the basics for citing a print journal article, an online journal article, and a journal article found through a library database.

MLA citations may include a variety of components. Sources may be part of a larger source, called a container. Examples of containers may be a database, website, or a book. The following examples will show you how to identify these components and how to place and format them into a proper MLA citation.

Example 1: A Print Journal Article

For the first example, you will learn how to cite a journal article that you found in print.

The first step is to identify the author of the article. The author of this article is Susan Fraiman.

To list an author, type the name in reverse order. Type the last name, a comma, and the first name, followed by a period. If the author’s middle name or initial is given, include it after the first name.

Example:
Fraiman, Susan.

Next, identify the title of the article. The title will usually be at the top of the article, in a font that is larger than the text.

The title of the article, enclosed in quotation marks, comes after the author. Capitalize the first word of the title, the first word of the subtitle (which comes after the colon), and all important words. Place a period after the title, but within the quotation marks.

Example:
Fraiman, Susan. “Domesticity beyond Sentiment: Edith Wharton, Decoration, and Divorce.”

Next, identify the publication information. This includes the title of the journal; the volume, issue, and page numbers; and the year of publication. Note that the issue may be referred to as the number. Usually this information can be found on the cover of the journal, on the table of contents, or at the top of the article. For the page numbers, you should look at the first and last pages of the article.

After the article title, type the journal title, in italics. Then, type a comma, the abbreviation vol., the volume number, a comma, the abbreviation no. and then the issue number. Type a comma, then give the year of publication. Type another comma, the abbreviation pp. and the page numbers. End this section with a period. This completes the citation.

Example:
Fraiman, Susan. “Domesticity beyond Sentiment: Edith Wharton, Decoration, and Divorce.” American Literature, vol. 83, no. 3, 2011, pp. 479-507.

If you refer to a work in your paper, by directly quoting, paraphrasing, or by referring to main ideas, you will need to include an in-text parenthetical citation. There are a number of ways to do this. In this example, a signal phrase is used to introduce a direct quote. Note that the author’s name is given in the text, and the page number is enclosed in parentheses at the end of the sentence.

Example:
Fraiman introduces the topic of decoration by noting “The 1890s saw a shying away from the aesthetic as well as family values of the Victorian period” (485).

Example 2: A Journal Article Found Online

You may encounter journal articles while searching on the Web. This article is from the online journal Australian Humanities Review.

Look for the information needed to cite the article at the top of the page or on the journal’s table of contents page. Note: this journal does not have volumes. Instead there are only issues. Also, since the articles are presented as HTML files, there are no page numbers.

An article found online will be cited like the print example. Since this journal does not have a volume number, the issue number stands alone. Since this article does not have page numbers, skip that element. Add the URL, omitting the http://.

Example:
O’Carroll, John. “Totaram’s Ghost.” Australian Humanities Review, no. 52, 2012. australianhumanitiesreview.org/2012/05/01/totarams-ghost/.

Example 3: Journal Article from a Library Database

Often, you will find journal articles online using the library’s databases. This article was found online using the database Art & Architecture Source.

The information you need to cite an article can be found on the article itself and in the database’s record. Look for the title at the top of the record and the publication information in the line labeled Source.

Since this article is from a library database, you will also need the name of the database. In this case it is Art & Architecture Source.

Finally, you will need either a DOI or a stable URL. If an article has a DOI, it will often be listed on the record or on the first page of the article. Look for stable URLs in the record, or see if there is a Permalink option.

Up to the page numbers, an article from a database will be cited like the previous journal examples. After the page numbers, type the name of the database, in italics, followed by a comma. Then provide the DOI or the stable URL. Omit the http:// from the stable URL. This completes this citation.

Example:
Steffensen, Ingrid. “Frank Lloyd Wright and the ‘Gift’ of Genius.” Journal of American Culture, vol. 32, no. 3, 2009, pp. 257-266. Art & Architecture Source, doi:10.1111/j.1542-734X.2009.00715.x.

For more examples and additional resources you may encounter when citing journal articles, visit the Santa Fe Library’s MLA Citations research guide. This can be found by visiting the library’s website, clicking Guides > Citations Guides and then MLA Citation Guide.

This concludes the video tutorial on citing journal articles using the MLA citation style guide. If you still have questions, please contact a librarian:

352-395-5409
reference@sfcollege.edu
sfcollege.edu/library